Seeing Greens, Lots and Lots of Greens

Turn off the screens and take it outside. Take time from work, from chores, from the day to day-tasks that keep us busy. Adults and children, take it outside. Each week I will challenge you to see and hear new things—to hunt the woods for wildflowers, to find shapes in nature, to sit by the waterside and listen for unique sounds. So much to experience out in the world!

Connecticut River in May

Jade, emerald, lime, asparagus, myrtle, olive, fern, moss, sea, pine, pear, swamp, forest, persian, shamrock, harlequin, jungle, camouflage, kelly, teal, aqua, grass. What images do these words conjure? What color do you see in your minds eye? Green? A particular shade, tone, or hue of green? A yellow green, a blue green, a dark green? Gardeners know that green is not a simple nor a single color. When designing a garden, the type of green of each plant is as important as the color of the flowers.

green, green, green, woodland plantsTo me, spring is all about green, in all its subtle and obvious variations. Before the leaves on the trees emerge and become more uniform in color, the hillsides look like an artist’s palette. Go out and look for green. Look closely at gardens, woodland plants, and landscapes. Look far into the distance at rolling hillsides, valleys, and river banks. Notice the greens. How many can you see? Notice and name the shades and variations! “Seeing green” has never been so much fun.

Green is a wonderful book that plays with the shades of green. Laura Vaccaro Seeger’s artwork is textural and rich. She adds playful cutouts to each page that carry the reader through the book. (If you would like to support Barking Frog Farm click on the book to reach Amazon.)

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